What if

What if we went global
What if we closed our shops
What if we worked at a round table everyday
What if we answered the phone without any recordings
What if we dropped everything for that great idea
What if we linked our salary to customer satisfaction
What if we called our customers to ask what they like
What if we donated our profits

What if we broke the rules

Who are you?

Guess Who

Most marketers obsess with who they’re targeting. What demographic? Location? Income?

All good questions. However, we can’t afford to ignore our current customers.

In fact, a qualifier for looking for more sales should be an intimate understanding about who our existing customers are.

How do they think? Why did they stick around? How do they feel about us?

This helps us reach similar people and help spread the word in already existing communities.

There’s no point reaching a new segment if one exists, untapped, right before your eyes.

The frustration gap

Service Experience Gap

Why do most call centre’s seem out of touch?

Is it the robotic voices that ask you to reveal your personal details out loud on public transport?

Could it be when they pretend to check with their supervisor before coming back with ‘no, we can’t do that’?

Or is it when we are transferred to 5 different departments before someone can help?

The gap

One overlooked reason why our customers become so frustrated with our service is how we structure our teams.

The people tasked with delivering and improving what we offer (marketing) are completely separate from the team that helps support that offer (customer service). In fact, they’re not only separated on the organisational chart, but often by countries and time zones too.

As a marketer, the best thing you can do to truly understand your user’s experience is not to spend time on social media listening, send out surveys or cold call customers – it’s to spend one day in your support centre.

Suddenly, you will see the frustration gap. You’ll see why quality support staff are essential to any business and why so many businesses fail.

You’ll see where potential customers drop out, why carts are abandoned and how a 1-step process can morph into 20.

The positive: we can fix it.

What are you doing to close the gap?

A sale is the beginning, not the end.

finishYou chase, advertise, pitch and door-knock. Then, finally, the customers start coming in.

We celebrate, set the next sales target and repeat.

But wait, what about those new customers? Did they get what they wanted? Did they buy something else? Do you have their contact details? What was their experience like?

We forget that it’s so much easier to retain customers who are already inclined to buy from us (based on past behaviour).

Instead, we search for the new, unconquered land of more. More targets + more ads = profit. Right?

We can’t afford to treat a transaction as the finish line. It’s only the beginning.

Marketers must cast off the Indiana Jones mentality and focus on delighting the customers they worked so hard to persuade.

Looking for more sales isn’t bad, but your previous customers are important too.

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Choose to love your customers

We often forget that our customers are just like us. They are perceptive and intelligent.

So why do we treat them like extra work? Why do we sigh and moan about how much stress they cause us?

Let’s choose optimism over cynicism.

Serve them like you would serve your own family, because the easiest way to lose a customer is to treat then like one.