Foot traffic

When a fruit shop owner is looking for somewhere to lease, they consider the positioning of the shop and how many people walk past each day.

The theory is that the more people walk past, the more exposure the shop receives and thereby the probability that someone will walk inside and purchase something.

Notice how many steps there are in that process?

Awareness
Consideration
Evaluation
Selection
Commitment

At least five opportunities for a lead to disappear.

It’s the same for a website, app, service, experience or relationship.

Making people aware you exist is only the first challenge. The rest of the purchase journey, or funnel in e-commerce terms, is just as at risk of leakage.

On the flip side, understanding where things go wrong at each of these steps presents a significant opportunity to improve your business.

Foot traffic, visitors, website visits and app downloads are only the beginning of the interaction. The rest is equally, if not more important.

Hitch a ride

hitchhiker
Life is full of trends. Like waves in the ocean, we can get swayed back and forth without realising it.

We know that the cycle of poverty is hard to break because there’s momentum behind generational unemployment.

Addictions are terrible because it’s not only the substance or behaviour, it’s the habitual repetition of that action that makes it hard to break.

On the positive, finding a mentor or boss with positive momentum can completely change your career or outlook on life.

Who will you hitch a ride with this year?

The big picture

The small issues can cause the most headaches, but have the least impact on results. Tensions escalate over a change of logo, where people sit and the dress code more often than they should.

It goes both ways, though, for those of us who want to make a big impact. Yes, we need to remember to focus on what really drives revenue. On what are the big hurdles stopping us from doubling our growth.

Equally, we need to acknowledge how important the ‘small’ things can be for others – and deal with them quickly.

Not to shoot the small stuff down, but to listen, act and encourage focus on the big picture.

5 minutes spent now explaining why that font was chosen, or offering to change it, could be an hour (or a week) saved of future productive time spent on things that matter.

I tried and failed

Life would be incredible boring if we knew what was going to happen next.

Failure is totally acceptable if you know why and how to avoid it next time. Actually, most of the things we try in business or life are not guaranteed.

Anxiety over the end result is worthless if you have answers for:

  1. How you approached the problem
  2. How you impacted the result
  3. Why you think you failed
  4. What you are going to do differently next time

Failure only happens when we can’t answer these questions, because then we haven’t tried to learn or care.

Understand the how before worrying about the what.

The expert of sharing

We see great leaders as experts in their fields. Visionaries of change and thought leaders defining the decades to come. The smartest, fastest or loudest.

Are they really that special, though? Are they that much braver than the rest of us? Of course not.

Great leaders gather people together and praise the latest ideas of others, steal like an artist and motivate the talented people in the group.

They aren’t always bright or talented.

So I want to propose something radical: leadership is an illusion.

Leaders aren’t the best in their niche. They’re the best persuaders, motivators and sharers.

They keep tabs on everyone that matters and distribute ideas that they know other people can convert into something great – with their influence.

Who are we sharing the best stuff with?

Who’s better equipped to make the changes we need to make?

What can we do today to be a better leader, not just a smarter expert?

Controllable

In any business, it’s easy to stress about the external factors that can bring us down.

It could be the economy, your customers, the industry or government. Things can go bad quickly.

However, many times we use these factors as excuses or as reasons to not invest as much time and effort into what we can control.

Sure, traffic to your site will fluctuate. Customers might out away their credit card in January.

But when the opposite happens, and it will, there will be no excuses as to why you didn’t take full advantage of it.

If the customer journey is broken, or illogical, sales will pass you by.

If we make the most of the uptrends, the down trends won’t hurt so much.

Fixed or flexible

flexible

It’s frustrating when someone comes along and ditches the plan. The plan we all agreed was the best path. The one we graphed and colour coded and said, in unison, ‘approved’.

It’s also frustrating when someone can’t break from the plan. The plan that is so constrictive, inflexible. The plan that’s stopping us from making something even better.

Both ways of thinking are perfectly fine, but can be equally dangerous.

Often I find myself in both camps. When I’m invested in the plan, I can’t stand it when people break it. When I want to break the plan, I can’t stand people who want to keep it.

Understanding the type of people you work with (and for), either planners or breakers, is a massive help.

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2 ways to take advice

  1. Ignore it. Pretend like you’ve heard it all before and that you should be the one giving them advice, not receiving it. Nod and say, ‘yeah, I do that already but it doesn’t work’.
  2. Even if we’ve heard it all before, listen. Think about why they’re telling it to you. What are their perceptions of you? What experiences have they had that you can learn from without making the same mistakes. Thank them. Ask them more questions. Sure, ignore the things you disagree with, privately. Everyone can learn something from someone else.

Advice is a gift and often helps us skip the most painful experiences because someone was kind enough to warn us or show us the way. Who can you give advice to today? Who do you need to listen to more?

 

I dare you

Green Eggs and HamDr. Seuss wrote Green Eggs and Ham after his editor challenged him to write a book using less than 50 words.

What happened? He wrote one of the best kids (and adult) books of all time. A creative classic. Poetry and art in a few pages.

When asked nicely, a work of art that transcends generations is rarely produced.

When dared, obstacles appear irrelevant. Motivation peaks and the creative juices flow freely.

So when you’re asked to do something impossible, dare yourself.

How do we know what we’re capable of unless we attempt the impossible?

Deliver at all costs

delivery
Photo: npr.com

Not delivering is the worst thing you can do. It gives me a feeling of dread in the pit of my stomach.

Sometimes we stall and delay because we’re afraid of showing people our work or being judged on the quality.

But the results are secondary, really. And the benefit of hindsight means we can improve, optimise and learn for next time.

If Amazon delayed delivering a book you ordered because they thought you might just return it, or write a bad review, you’d be mad.

So, let’s keep our commitments. Even if it’s the worst thing you’ve ever done, ship it. Press send. Turn up. Apply.

Then learn from it. Doing nothing is worse than doing something badly.